Fast Facts

Did you know?

Many people know that ‘breast is best’ when it comes to infant feeding. However, the research is growing that shows that there are also risks of not breastfeeding. The following fast facts highlight the growing number of benefits of breastfeeding, as well as the risks associated with not breastfeeding your baby.

Many people know that ‘breast is best’ when it comes to infant feeding. However, the research is growing that shows that there are also risks of not breastfeeding. The following fast facts highlight the growing number of benefits of breastfeeding, as well as the risks associated with not breastfeeding your baby.

The success among mothers who want to breastfeed can be improved through active support (US Dept. of Health and Human Services, 2011; AAFP, 2008).

Breastfeeding protection, promotion and support increases the percentage of mothers who breastfeed their child beyond six months. Studies have shown that when all forms of breastfeeding support are offered at all follow-ups with the child up to nine months of age, mothers are encouraged to continue breastfeeding (Renfrew, McCormick, Wade, Quinn & Dowswell, 2012).

Breastfeeding and appropriate complementary feeding are among the most effective interventions to promote child health, growth and development (WHO/UNICEF, 2008).

Findings have consistently shown a decreased risk of maternal breast cancer with longer durations of breastfeeding (Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer, 2002; Chang-Claude, Eby, Kiechle, Bastert, & Becher, 2000; Brinton et al., 1995).

Fathers or partners and the wider family are part of the mother's social environment and have a role in supporting breastfeeding, especially for longer durations (AAFP, 2008). They need information about breastfeeding, answers to their questions, and clarification about any myths or misconceptions (AAFP, 2008).

Breastfeeding helps your baby decide when she is hungry and when she is full. This helps with appetite regulation for life.

The World Health Organization and Health Canada recommend that babies receive only breast milk for the first six months of life.

Breastfeeding should continue for up to two years or more with the introduction of nutrient rich complementary foods from the age of six months.

Breastmilk contains special fatty acids not found in formula that help your baby’s brain to develop and boost brain power.

The fat in breastmilk contains high levels of cholesterol and this may protect your child from high cholesterol levels later in life.

Research suggests that breastfeeding provides some protection for the mother against breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and weak bones later in life.

Breastmilk contains important antibodies that help prevent diseases and infections (e.g., middle ear infections, pneumonia, diarrhea and vomiting, and juvenile diabetes). Breastfeeding may reduce the risk of your baby developing allergies (if there is a family history of allergies).

Breastfeeding offers some protection against Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) or crib death.

72.4% of women start breastfeeding in hospital in Newfoundland and Labrador (PPNL, 2015).

According to regional health authorities, the breastfeeding initiation rate in hospitals for 2013 in the province was 70%. (Source: Provincial Neonatal Screening Program Feb 2014)

Hospital initiation rates for breastfeeding in NL range from 45 – 80% (Provincial Neonatal Screening Program February 2014).

Across Canada, almost 89% of women start breastfeeding. (Statistics Canada, CCHS 2011- 2012).

26% of Canadian women exclusively breastfeed for six months. (Statistics Canada, CCHS 2011-2012).

Breastfeeding Handbook 2016
Breastfeeding Handbook 2016

Read More
World Breastfeeding Week 2016
World Breastfeeding Week 2016

Read More
NEW YouTube Video!
NEW YouTube Video!

**New YouTube Video! Release Date October 1st, 2016 as a part of the World Breastfeeding Week activities in NL** Baby-Friendly NL would like to thank the breastfeeding moms (and supportive partners) that participated in the new YouTube Video.

Read More
Private Lactation Consultant
Private Lactation Consultant

Janet Beattie is a private practice Lactation consultant (IBCLC) with over eight years experience. She provides 1.5-2 hour home visits, and is available evenings and weekends. Please click here for more details and for contact information.

Read More
Breastfeeding Myths Part 1
Breastfeeding Myths Part 1

"If Babies Could Talk: What They'd Want You to Know about Breastfeeding" - This new video will be used throughout Public Health in NL, as well as shared widely over social media for public education and awareness.

Read More
World Breastfeeding Week
World Breastfeeding Week

World Breastfeeding Week (in Canada) will be celebrated October 1-7, 2015. In Newfoundland and Labrador, this year's theme is: "Breastfeeding...Making it Work". Click below for more information about events and how you can join the celebration!

Read More
Photo & Video
View All
Latest Tweet

Longer parental leave... but at a cost. What do you think? #budget2017 https://t.co/091aHKutfU